Oct 18, 2009

Posted by in From Readers, The Filipina | 18 Comments

Abandoned Children and the Great Filipina Sperm War

Abandoned Children and the Great Filipina Sperm War

This is an email from a reader of the filipinaimages.com reader.

steve1
Steve Schertzer, [email protected]
October 15, 2009

Disclaimer: The following is an opinion piece based on fact.

— “The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing; to know in their hearts and see the evils going on around them, but to sit back and let it unfold whether out of fear, apathy or both.”

—Edmund Burke, Irish Political Philosopher. (1730-1797.)

I so want to be wrong about this. I want to be wrong because I feel vindicated and it doesn’t feel good. It’s not because of the Filipino mothers or the foreign fathers. It’s because of the children. I feel vindicated because of the children. In a response to a letter I wrote for www.filipinaimages.com on March 27th, 2009, titled “The Image of the Modern Filipina”, I said this:

“If the Philippines keeps on importing less than stellar foreign men to marry their women, in 10 years this once beautiful country will have tens of thousands of half-breeds running around looking for their foreign fathers, who will have awoken one morning to realize that marrying an uneducated, dirt-poor Filipina was not to their liking after all.”

Yes I did say that, but I was wrong. It’s not “tens of thousands” of children looking for their non-Filipino fathers. It’s hundreds of thousands. And it’s not “in 10 years.” It’s now. And, (if I may correct myself again), it’s not as if these non-Filipinos are marrying any of these “uneducated, dirt-poor Filipinas.” Most are not. So I apologize for my errors. You see, this problem of abandoned half-Filipino half-whatever children is far worse than I originally thought.

Here are three questions that I would like answered by Filipinos, men and women, after you have read and contemplated this well enough to respond intellectually and wisely.

1) Is there a “sperm war” involving foreign men in the Philippines?
2) Is this who Filipinas truly are?
3) Where is the outrage?

There is a seismic shift in Filipino society. It’s been happening for a long time. It’s not an earthquake, although it may feel like one. It’s not a series of typhoons, although millions of lives are being ruined by it. This seismic shift is not geological. Neither is it a product of mother nature’s wrath. This seismic shift in Filipino society is value based. It is a huge shift in personal morality and social ethics. It is a fall from grace. A huge fall from what once was to what is now.

The quotes I use from articles, newspaper columns, and websites will enlighten and inform, but I doubt if it will shock. That’s the real tragedy. Here is the full article from the October 5, 2009 edition of the Korea Times under the headline “Kopinos Search for Korean Dads.”

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By Jonathan M. Hicap
Korea Times Correspondent

MANILA ? In an apartment in a poor community in Culiat, Quezon City, north of Manila, the endless laughter of 11 children fills the driveway. But beyond their loud chatter and playful stance, these kids are struggling to find their true identity and future in a country mired in poverty.

The two rooms in the apartment’s Unit 6 provide shelter to these deprived Filipino children?unrelated by blood but bound by a painful and haunting past: they were abandoned by their Korean fathers.

They are called Kopinos, a term that refers to children born to Korean fathers and Filipino mothers. Their number in the Philippines has increased as the number of Korean tourists visiting the Southeast Asian country has grown in the last two decades.

One of the 11 children is 15-year-old Dawn Dela Dia, who never met her father and was abandoned by him even before she was born.

Since 2007, Dawn has been living at the shelter run by the Kopino Children Association (KCA), a recognized non-government organization established in 2006 by spouses Son Bum-sik, a Korean, and Normi Son, a Filipino.

Dawn said her only memory of her dad was his picture, which was kept secretly by her mom.

The issue of Kopinos has become a social problem in the Philippines and viewed as a disgrace in South Korea. According to Son, there are more than 10,000 Kopinos in the Philippines, although there is no official data on their exact number.

Kopinos are the product of the multibillion tourism industry in the Philippines. Foreign visitors prop up the Philippine economy through the spending much-needed dollars.

However, tourism gave birth to the sex tourism industry in the Philippines, where thousands of Filipino women work as guest relations officers, bar girls and prostitutes despite the fact prostitution is illegal in the predominantly Christian country.

This has taken its toll on the welfare of Filipino women, and resulted in an increase in the number of illegitimate Filipino children born to foreigners.

For decades, the presence of U.S. military bases in Zambales and Pampanga provinces in the northern Philippines fueled red-light districts in Angeles City, Olongapo and nearby areas.

When the U.S. bases moved out in 1992, more than 50,000 `Amerasian’ children?those born to American fathers and Filipino mothers?were left behind.

In addition, there is also a group of children called Japinos, who were born to Filipino and Japanese parents.

The rise in the number of Kopinos is attributed to the upsurge in the number of Koreans visiting the Philippines. Koreans are now the No. 1 tourist group in the country. In 2008, more than 611,000 Koreans visited the country. In addition, there are 115,400 Koreans who are currently living in the Philippines.

This phenomenon is attributed to South Korea’s rise as a developed nation. Koreans can now afford to travel and even study in different countries. The Philippines is a favorite destination because of the low cost of living, tropical weather and schools offering English education to Koreans.

The present migration of Koreans to the Philippines is being driven by Korea’s increasing prosperity, wrote Virginia Miralao in a study exploring transnational communities in the Philippines, which dealt in part with the Korean diaspora in the country.

Son said the rise in the number of fatherless Kopinos was a product of the mindset of Koreans who were visiting the Philippines to enjoy life but not to get married to Filipino women. Enjoying life, of course, means hitting strip bars, paying for sex and getting temporary Filipina girlfriends.

They never think of marrying Filipino women and just enjoy their lives here, she said.

But, for some Filipino women, they consider relationships with foreigners as their ticket out of poverty. Unfortunately, this often turns out to be wishful thinking as Korean men quickly abandon the women after a night of sex or when they learn they are pregnant.

Son explained that the Korean cultural history of disapproving of mixed marriages has been a factor in the abandoning of Filipino children.

“In the past, mixed marriage was prohibited. That’s why I understand the behavior of the Korean men,” he said.

Most fathers of Kopinos are tourists, students and businessmen who visited the Philippines for a short time and then went back to their home country.

About 85 to 90 percent of the mothers of Kopino children work as bar girls or in brothels frequented by foreigners.

Son said he and his wife established the KCA to improve the lives of Kopino children.

They want to give them the opportunity to study, he said.

Son first visited the Philippines in 1992 for a vacation. He was a member of Stump Mission, a missionary group in the Philippines.

He met his wife, Normi, through the mission center. His wife is the founder of the Montessori Teacher Preparation (MTP) program in the Philippines.

Son said he felt the need to help Kopino children since their child is also half-Korean, half-Filipino and he wanted to erase discrimination against these children.

“It is my responsibility to my wife and my child. I want to give the Kopinos the opportunity,” he said.

Most Kopino children come from poor families that can’t afford to send them to school.

The KCA was established in Quezon City in 2006. Across from the shelter is the Seedschild School, which was also established by the Sons, where the Kopino children involved with the association study.

The school offers preschool and elementary education to Kopino children, alongside other children in the community as well.

According to Ella Medado, a teacher there, the school now has 24 elementary students, including 10 Kopinos, and 35 preschool students.

Jason Sarcon, a 16-year-old Kopino, is a Grade 6 student at the school. He said that at an early age, he stopped going to school because of poverty. He arrived at the shelter in May this year.

He said he met his Korean father when he was four years old and recalled that he was in the garments business. He said his mother no longer wants him but still hopes to receive money for child support.

Son said they took it upon themselves to take care of the children rather than give money to their mothers, to ensure that the kids get a proper education.

“If we give them money directly, they will use it in different ways. Probably, they will not use the money for the education of the children,” he said.

The 11 youngsters live at the shelter while their mothers live at home. Every Saturday, the mothers visit the shelter.

The children not only receive a basic education but learn all about Korea as well.

“We have a Saturday school where we teach them the Korean language and culture,” Son said. “The mothers are also taught how to write in Hangeul.”

The Sons take care of the children’s expenses with the help of donors and their Korean friends, without assistance from the Philippine and Korean governments.

While they want to take in more Kopino children, Son says the facilities are not large enough to accommodate them.

“We need a bigger space, more volunteers and more workers. The facility should be big enough.”

To help the mothers of the Kopino children, Son said they are planning to start a livelihood project.

“We want to teach them (the mothers) how to catch fish to teach the mothers how to have their own source of income.”

In addition, he said they will start a canteen where they will sell Korean food at a lower price compared to restaurants.

For the Kopino children, the possibility of acquiring Korean citizenship cannot happen unless their parents get married, according to Korean law.

“If the parents are not legally married, it is not possible for them to become Korean citizens. The parents must be legally married,” Son said.

But Son hopes the problems of a low birthrate and an aging population in South Korea may become an opportunity for the children.

“I hope they can get Korean citizenship. In Korea, the population is now declining. Few people are giving birth while the aging population is growing. They need a labor force. They need our Kopino children,” Son said.

However, the Korean government has been silent on the issue.

Dawn and Jason said one of their dreams is to be able to go to Korea, though not necessarily to meet their fathers.

When asked about his dad, Jason says he misses him and that he is not angry despite the fact he was abandoned.

“I am not mad at him because I don’t know the real reason why he and my mom parted ways,” he said.

For his part, Son said he doesn’t want to judge his countrymen.

“We don’t want to judge them morally. We must understand them. Actually, it is not only the father’s mistake but also the mother’s,” he said, adding that some of the fathers do not know that they have a child in the Philippines.

Medado said some Filipino women may have the idea that foreigners can help change the course of their lives, a perception that has become a vicious cycle that must be stopped.

She said Filipino women should be educated to prevent the cycle from happening again.

For the KCA and the Sons, their mission will continue as long as there are Kopino children and their mothers in need of help.

They will continue to help the children secure a better future and, in the process, help them find their true identity.

To donate to the Kopino Children Association, go to www.kopino.co.kr.
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Interesting, huh? Let there be no doubt as to where I place the lion’s share of the blame for this tragedy. Squarely on the shoulders of the Filipinas. Sex-tourism aside, Filipinas know exactly what they are doing. I am not excusing the men. They know what they’re doing too, but many have no idea what the Filipina game is. I say game, but what I should say is war. In the game of love, people have their hearts broken. In a war, people have their bones broken. Or lose their lives. Whether the men are Korean, Chinese, Japanese, American, Australian, German, French, British, or Canadian, many have no idea that they are involved in this war; a sperm war that will pit them (and their sperm) against other men in a race so that Filipinas can get pregnant. Many of these men have no idea that once they take a loose Filipina to a hotel room for a week or two, she will inevitably receive numerous text messages on her cell phone from friends asking, “Are you pregnant yet?” It doesn’t matter who she’s with. Pregnancy remains the ultimate goal because in the mind of these Filipinas, pregnancy is a means to an end. The end being money. The end being a green card. The end being a fiancee visa. The end being what they think is a better life in someone else’s country.

From www.wordiq.com/definition/Sperm_competition
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Sperm competition is “competition between sperm of two or more males for the fertilisation of an ova.” (Parker 1970). Sperm competition is often compared to having tickets in a raffle; if a female mates multiple times, the more sperm a particular male inseminates her with, the more chance he has of winning.

(Parker, G.A. 1970. “Sperm competition and its evolutionary consequences in the insects”, Biological Reviews 45: 525-567.)
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From an article titled “Sperm Competition and the Kamikase Sperm Hypothosis” posted on www.seductionlabs.org/2007/05.
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Baker and Bellis go on to claim that women can (unconsciously) control the outcome of a sperm competition, and we accept that since women evaluate men by many criteria (emotional, intellectual, physical, financial etc.) while searching for the appropriate qualities in a parent, colleague, friend, lover, protector etc. that there is no reason why a woman should not find herself socially paired with one man, but disposed to have extra-pair sex with another man.
Women are quite likely to be concerned about the overall quality of the male who fertilizes her eggs; and the internal reproductive tract3 of a women produces many barriers, including anti-sperm antibodies that can interfere with fertilization by immobilizing, or even destroying sperm and by impairing their ability to penetrate the egg, while other antibodies act against the egg’s membrane to prevent early egg cleavage and development. The key point here is that these antibodies do not necessarily reduce fertility; instead they diminish the fertility of certain male-female pairings. Therefore, a woman may enhance her reproductive success by seeking a different sexual partner, while retaining her social marital partner (all quite possibly unconsciously).

(Baker, R. R., and M. A. Bellis, Human Sperm competition London: Chapman & Hall, 1995)
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Personally I couldn’t care less about the men who are taken for a financial ride by money-hungry Filipinas. And I care even less for the Filipinas who perform sexual acts in this sperm war that would make even the most veteran of porno actress blush. A pox on both their houses. My plastic heart beats on. But my real heart breaks for the children of such sick unions. They did not ask to be born. These children did not ask their horny non-Filipino father and their greedy money-hungry Filipina mother to give them life so that the vicious cycle of poverty and child abandonment can live on generation after generation. What stupidity. What selfishness.

Let me be very clear. Telling the men to “keep it in your pants” is one thing. It may be a good idea, but the Philippines is not their country. What do they care? They come to the Philippines to “take it out of their pants.” Filipinas know this. (And, quite frankly, so does the Department of Tourism.”) Most of the men who visit the Philippines have no vested interest in the future prosperity of the Filipino nation. In fact, keeping the Philippines poor is what these sex-tourists seek since desperate, immoral, and financially poor Filipinas will keep flocking to them. Telling Filipinas to “keep your legs closed” may sound like a quaint and old-fashioned notion, but it is absolutely essential if the vicious cycle of poverty and child abandonment is to be reduced. This problem is squarely in the hands of Filipinos, not foreigners. Filipinos know that. Now they must accept the responsibility to rebuild their nation based on family values, personal morality, and social ethics.

If you, the Filipino people, believe that your country is great but the hundreds of thousands of pimps, thugs, prostitutes, bar-girls, webcam girls, Internet cyber-brides, and yes, the sex-tourists are ruining the Philippines, then STAND UP, RAISE YOUR VOICE, and TAKE YOUR COUNTRY BACK. Take it back. It’s yours. But, you, the Filipino people, will have to do the heavy lifting.

It may be fashionable to view prostitution and sex-tourism as a supply and demand phenomenon with the majority of the blame going to those who demand it. But the truth is, those Filipinas who supply it, are in a superior position. To use a sports analogy, they have the home field advantage. Like in any war, they are waiting to ambush the enemy. In this case, the enemy is any foreigner they think has money and good genes. Since these Filipinas missed the proverbial boat with their own men, (Filipino men with an ounce of self-respect wouldn’t be caught dead with a Filipina who chases foreigners; after all, they are not the kind of girls you take home to mother), many Filipinas have now taken their war to the foreign masses. These Filipinas know exactly what they’re doing and, for that reason, it is they who must be held accountable for the current situation of fatherless children.

Remember question number one: Is there a “sperm war” involving foreign men in the Philippines? I ask this for two important reasons: (1) The evidence contained in the newspaper articles about so many Filipinas getting pregnant by foreign men, and (2), the hypothosis about sperm competition put forth by scientists and evolutionary biologists (Parker, Baker, and Bellis), and the seeming connection between them.

Those who believe or claim that Filipinas are the victims here, shame on you. Shame on you! You should know better. These Filipinas are not only destroying the social fabric of their own country, they are also contributing to the destruction of families in other societies. They are not victims. How dare anybody claim that the Filipinas who engage in this kind of behavior are victims. They are not useless. They are not worthless. With their selfish and lascivious behavior, these Filipinas are adding to the horrendous situation which sees over one million street children in the Philippines today. They are the perpetrators of this war; a war they can end at any time. They won’t because they are winning.

For those loose Filipinas who are ignorant enough to think that it’s only Korean men who abandon their mixed-race children, read on. The story from the Korea Times is just one article on this issue which deals specifically with Korean tourists. Here are some quotes from others. This from the Philippine Inquirer:
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Japanese-Filipino children long for fathers.
By Anna Valmero
INQUIRER.net First Posted 15:01:00 09/10/2009

“The ongoing migration of Filipina entertainers or ‘overseas performing artists’ to Japan since the late 1970s has produced an estimated 200,000 Japanese-Filipino children (JFCs), many of whom were abandoned and much more get no support from their Japanese fathers.”
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Or this from the Associated Press on March 28, 2008.
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“An estimated 50,000 Japanese-Filipino children — known as ‘Japinos’ — live here, often abandoned or orphaned by their fathers after liaisons with Filipino women, who in most cases worked as entertainers in Japan, said Akira Oka, head of the Shin-Nikkeijin Network or SNN. Some groups put the number as high as 100,000.”
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And this from the Korea Times article “Kopinos Search for Korean Dads” (October 5, 2009.)
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“When the U.S. bases moved out in 1992, more than 50,000 `Amerasian’ children?those born to American fathers and Filipino mothers?were left behind.”
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Kopinos? Japinos? Ameripinos? What in the world is going on here?

Remember question number two: Is this who Filipinas truly are? Is it? It can’t be. Societies have been know to collapse from within when social values disintegrate to this extent. Filipinas! You are not like this! Are you? I’ve met so many wonderful and hard-working Filipinas over the years. I’ve dated them. I’ve had Filipina girlfriends the 1990′s in my home country of Canada. Is this what you have become? Someone please enlighten me because I don’t know.

You want to know what I did to research this opinion piece? I used google. I googled this: “abandoned filipino/??? children.” The three question marks? Fill in the blank. It’s up to you. Abandoned filipino/korea children. Abandoned filipino/japanese children. Abandoned filipino/american children. It all comes up. I can keep going, you know. Abandoned filipino/australian children. Abandoned filipino/european children. It’s all there. Article after article. Page after page. Support group after support group. This stinks! There is nothing here of which to be proud. Are these children thanking their mothers for a life of poverty, discrimination, and parental abandonment? Apparently, none of these mothers have learned anything from history.

In his book “Over the Edge of the World”, Laurence Bergreen recounts the story of Ferdinand Magellan’s 16th century voyage to the Philippines. Filipinos know the story well. Magellan arrived in April of 1521 with about 150 sailors. He traded gold, spices, and other goods. He was taken to Cebu. He and his sailors began to spread Christianity. But the good will from the natives didn’t last long. He was killed in the Battle of Mactan by an army led by Lapu-Lapu. Christianity wasn’t the only thing Magellan and his cohorts attempted to spread.

This from an article on CNN.com
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The man who almost sailed the world
Author offers new chronicle of Magellan’s voyage
By Adam Dunn
Special to CNN
Thursday, October 16, 2003 Posted: 11:32 AM EDT (1532 GMT)

“Bergreen also chronicles some of the less savory — but all-too-common — behavior of the voyagers, much of which has become better known in recent years.
“We hear a great deal more about how the sailors lived, the orgies with [native] women,” the author said of what his new research had turned up. “We got a full account, X-rated, about Magellan’s voyage … orgies on beaches, sailors fathering children by local women.”
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Orgies on the beach! Sailors fathering children by local women then taking off in their boats! My, how times have changed. It’s nice to see that almost 500 years later, many Filipinas have now gotten all that whoring and debauchery out of their system.

And it’s not that many Filipinos mind. Apparently, they don’t. I don’t see or hear the outrage involving sex-tourism, either in the Philippines or elsewhere.

This from Manila Times columnist Tim Tayag on April 6, 2009. He writes about how the Philippines can increase tourism.
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SKEPTIC TANK
By Tim Tayag
Pimping up tourism

“Let’s highlight our strengths and make our weeknesses sound like strengths. Come visit the Philippines, we’re cheap, we can speak English, and we don’t mind if you marry our women, just don’t beat them up. It’s truthful and it doesn’t pass judgement. So what if it will attract a lot of old balding German men with Asian fetishes, as long as they give our poor women a better life, I’m all for it. If we can just set our hypocrisy aside and be more practical, I think our country can be a great tourist nation again.”
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WHAT?!? This may have been written tongue-in-cheek, but come on. After all of the disgusting and criminal behavior of Filipina bar-girls, Internet cyber-brides and their Johns, you would think that some people in the Philippine media would know better. There was, however, a disclaimer from the editors of the Manila Times following Tayag’s column.
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(“Kidding aside, The Manila Times is vehemently against post-colonial exploitation such as marriages based solely on monetary gain and personal convenience—Ed”).
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“… we don’t mind if you marry our women…”

Why not? Most other Asian societies do. Middle-eastern countries do. And for good reason. These countries have already looked at the Philippines and Thailand and have concluded that the last thing they need coming to their shores are sex-tourists and pedophiles. They don’t need foreign men from all over the world impregnating their women, then leaving on a jet plane.

“So what if it [tourism] will attract a lot of old balding German men with Asian fetishes, as long as they give our poor women a better life, I’m all for it.”

WHAT?!? I would love to see an old balding foreign man try to grab a woman’s ass in Saudi Arabia and see what happens. He will end up spending his remaining days on earth searching the desert for his testicles. That’s if he’s lucky. More than likely he will be beaten to a pulp. Sexually propositioning a woman in Pakistan, India, Nepal, Indonesia, or a hundred other countries? Fat chance! Any foreign man who tries that will have his head used as a bowling ball.

Remember question number three: Where is the outrage? From the Filipino media. From the Filipino Government. From Filipino politicians. From the Filipino business community. From Filipino teachers. From Filipino parents. From Filipino grandparents. From every sector of Filipino society. Where in the world is the outrage?

Why is it just fine and dandy for fat balding foreign men to come to the Philippines to live out their sick sexual fantasies with Filipinas less than half their age? How many more “Kopinos” “Japinos” “Ameripinos” or any other kind of “pinos” must be born and abandoned before the Philippines gets the message that well— maybe it’s not such a good idea to pimp your sisters and daughters to foreign men? When is it time to start protecting your sisters and daughters? I believe these questions deserve honest and thoughtful answers.

“… as long as they [foreign men] give our poor women a better life…”

Hey, how much is your sister worth? How about your daughter? What do you think she’s worth? In pesos, dollars, yen, won, euros, pounds? It doesn’t matter. Put a price tag on the Filipina body. Because that’s what you’re doing when Filipinos say things like “as long as they [foreign men] give our poor women a better life.” How about giving your own women a better life? How about Filipino mothers and fathers making sure that their children go to college so that they [the children] wouldn’t have to sell their bodies to foreigners? All of these stories and articles about abandoned and fatherless children doesn’t sound like a better life to me. Maybe to you, I don’t know. But not to me.

I’m going to end with a quote from a young Filipina. If you won’t listen to me then maybe you’ll listen to her. I hope you do. Her name is Denise and she commented on my lettters I wrote to www.filipinaimages on March 27, 2009 titled “The Image of the Modern Filipina.”
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“It’s not just prostitution we’re dealing with, it’s the idea of a young girl looking for someone who’s old, rich and decrepit (matandang mayamang madaling mamatay). It’s a concept that’s unfortunately passed down from parents to daughters in the Philippines, especially in poorer families. I personally have been advised by relatives to find a Caucasian to marry who can give me a better life. Indeed, I’ve had screaming matches with them because I flatly refused to marry for money or skin colour or citizenship (I didn’t care how much trouble I got in for answering back at certain grandparents). These women who marry foreigners will mostly ask for citizenship (of themselves and/or their parents/siblings) and/or money to be sent regularly back home (”to help”). They will “love” you if you pay for their needs and their families needs.

Each time I think of how degrading it was to have to explain that I wasn’t “that kind of Filipina”, I quake with anger. I’ve been getting approached by men old enough to be my dad since I was twelve. There’s no excuse for ignorance. I’ve never advertised myself as a mail-order bride or as even someone specifically looking for a foreigner, but because I’m a Filipina, these men seem to think I’m a mail-order bride. And I’ve been approached by men from several countries in different continents, so please don’t tell me these concerns are unfounded. It’s a verbal slap in the face to be told that I’m supposed to accept all that degradation and humiliation because I’m a Filipina.”
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Let’s read two quotes from Denise once again:
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“I personally have been advised by relatives to find a Caucasian to marry who can give me a better life.”

“I’ve been getting approached by men old enough to be my dad since I was twelve.”
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Wow. I find that breathtaking. And tragic. What can you say about people who do this to girls like Denise? What can anyone say about a society that allows this to happen to its daughters and sisters? Thank you, Denise. Now where are all the other Filipinas like Denise? Those with the courage to speak out against their immoral and unethical sisters who, by their very actions and behavior, are making all Filipinas look like prostitutes and golddiggers. Where are they? I know they’re out there. Is it not time to speak up? Is it not time to fight back?

If you, the Filipino people, believe that your country is great but the hundreds of thousands of pimps, thugs, prostitutes, bar-girls, webcam girls, Internet cyber-brides, and yes the sex-tourists are turning the Philippines into one of the world’s biggest sexual playgrounds, then RISE UP, SHOUT AT THE TOP OF YOUR VOICE, and TAKE YOUR COUNTRY BACK. Take it back. It’s yours. But you, the Filipino people, will have to do the heavy lifting.

Because if you don’t, if you don’t shout at the top of your lungs; if you don’t rise up; if you don’t fight back; if you don’t take your country back, then you are a part of the problem. I began this opinion piece with the famous quote by Edmund Burke.

“The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing; to know in their hearts and see the evils going on around them, but to sit back and let it unfold whether out of fear, apathy or both.”

It is now time to cease your fear. It is now time to become less apathetic. It is now time to do something. For the sake of all of the abandoned children, it is now time to do good.

  1. David C. Weaver says:

    Not all Filipino women are like this, my bride to be is a College Professor and Architect, and her family are well educated and well employed. Yes there are plenty of lower economic class Filipino women looking for foreign husbands, not just Koreans. They come here to Korea near the Army bases and attempt to hook up with US Army guys. Although it is the responsibility of the woman for her pregnancy also, its not much of a man who fathers a child and then does not support it or the mother. Culture is no excuse, Americans do it too, and mixed kids are common in America. If you go to the Philippines you notice new construction going on, especially in Manila, if it wasn’t for the corruption and mismanagement of Marcos this country would be much more developed. Until you have lived a desperate life don’t judge people who are trapped in poverty. Koreans use culture as an excuse for many types of despicable behavior, and a man who takes no responsibility for his actions is no man at all. The government of the Phillipines is still mired in corruption and does very little to help people, some of the worse slums in the world are in Manila side by side with high rises. I raised my daughter even after I was divorced she lived with me. I paid her bills in college and will continue to help her. She is in Germany now on the Full Bright and I still help, she always comes first. As to my wife to be she sent all three of her kids to college too, without any man to help her. Its easy to find an excuse to do the wrong thing but it takes guts and sacrifice to do the right thing. So be a man step and claim your responsibility no excuses for Koreans, Americans or anybody else.

  2. I failed to see in your article the huge number of filipino guys that abandon their responsibilities after getting a girl pregnant. I think there are far more abandon babies fathered by filipinos than by foreigners. People are going to have sex, whatever the reason, so the problem is education about birth control.

    Please tell the world the real problems in the Philippines.
    The poor girls (Samar, Leyte) are the ones the frequently become bargirls, as they have little hope in the province. They will never find a guy outside of their social class. They know they are destined to be just like their mother if they stay in the province. There is no way to break the cycle of poverty in these very poor regions. The girls coming to the bar usually are the ones that had a filipino boyfriend that abandoned them after getting them pregnant, or ones that were promised marriage to get them to have sex.
    The girls learn quite early that even the worse foreigner may be better than the best filipino they can get in the province.
    The problem lies in the social structure of the Philippines. It is usually the poor girls that are looking for a foreigner, as they have little hope for anything that can get them out of their situation in life.
    You rarely see the upper class girls with foreigners, or even desiring foreigners, as they have the advantage of being able to find a successful filipino in their social class.
    Poverty and the social class system of the Philippines is the true cause of foreigners coming to the Philippines to prey upon the girls. What other option is there for a poor girl from Samar? She can either stay in the province, get pregnant from a local poor guy, and live in poverty the rest of her life, or go out and try to find a foreigner that may give her a better life. It is a gamble they are willing to take.

  3. Dear Steve,

    I would like to say thank you so much for the articles that you have posted. I am a Filipina who traveled in different lands and I can say that I am blessed because I grew up in Baguio City where poverty is not that common and I am born into a middle class family. My parents are both highly educated but not snobs. They instilled in me that though I have to be thankful of the things I have, I should also make one of my aims to help my nation.

    I had a choice to be a doctor or a lawyer and to study abroad but I chose to be a missionary instead. I wanted to find myself, to serve other people in different countries and also to see how the Filipinos are in the Philippines and outside the Philippines. Sadly, I was not treated well in other countries because of my passport. And as I traveled, I met Filipinas who work as “entertainers” as they call themselves. . . . who had children with different nationalities..

    It breaks my heart how these people try to do everything just to find a more comfortable life…I try to think and contemplate and try to organize in my mind who is to blame….

    It also sickens me that other people encourage mail order brides. On line dating exclusively for filipinas and others.. I am now in the US and I met a lot of men telling me that they know someone who were left by their filipina wives just after they got their green cards..
    (Yes, I am in the US but I still love my country and I try to do as much as I can to help).

    It’s easy to blame poverty , but I guess that is the reality. Most filipinas who marry someone from another country are like you said “dirt-poor”.

    I feel like i want to do something but I am powerless…I want to get angry with the government..especially the officials, how calloused their hearts are! They spend livelihood project money in their own liking. Vacations abroad, flashy cars, mansions.. How dare they! how dare they! Especially in Manila, Cebu, Davao and Pampanga where the contrast or rich and poor are very evident. Even though I am a Christian, I admit that I also “blame” God. Maybe not actually blaming him but asking, questioning him why is he allowing these things? until when will the Filipinos suffer until he will save us? I also blame the Filipinos. I may sound like self-righteous but honestly, out of billions of Filipinos out there, only a handful really love our country and I am sure that I am one of them. When will the Filipinos realize that how we live our lives day by day affects how we are and definitely affects our country.

    I am working and praying and hoping that the people will change so that the system will change. I am just beginning to do something small but I can always try, I might fail but that is part of life.

    I love you Philippines and I am always… crying.. and praying … and try to make a difference…for you…

  4. Dear Steve,
    (Resent edited)
    I would like to say thank you so much for the articles that you have posted. I am a Filipina who traveled in different lands and I can say that I am blessed because I grew up in Baguio City where poverty is not that common and I am born into a middle class family. My parents are both highly educated but not snobs. They instilled in me that though I have to be thankful of the things I have, I should also make one of my aims to help my nation.and and

    I had a choice to be a doctor or a lawyer and to study abroad but I chose to be a missionary instead. I wanted to find myself, to serve other people in different countries and also to see how the Filipinos are in the Philippines and outside the Philippines. Sadly, I was not treated well in other countries because of my passport. And as I traveled, I met Filipinas who work as “entertainers” as they call themselves. . . . who had children.. withmen of different nationalities..

    It breaks my heart how these people try to do everything just to find a more comfortable life…I try to think and contemplate and try to organize in my mind who is to blame….

    It also sickens me that other people encourage mail order brides. On line dating exclusively for filipinas and others.. I am now in the US and I met a lot of men telling me that they know someone who were left by their filipina wives just after they got their green cards..
    (Yes, I am in the US but I still love my country and I try to do as much as I can to help).

    It’s easy to blame poverty , but I guess that is the reality. Most filipinas who marry someone from another country are like you said “dirt-poor”.

    I feel like i want to do something but I am powerless…I want to get angry with the government..especially the officials, how calloused their hearts are! They spend livelihood project money in their own liking. Vacations abroad, flashy cars, mansions.. How dare they! how dare they! Especially in Manila, Cebu, Davao and Pampanga where the contrast of rich and poor are very evident. Even though I am a Christian, I admit that I also “blame” God. Maybe not actually blaming him but asking him, questioning him – why is he allowing these things? until when will the Filipinos suffer until when will he will save us? I also blame the Filipinos. I may sound like self-righteous but honestly, out of billions of Filipinos out there, only a handful really love our country and I am sure that I am one of them. When will the Filipinos realize that how we live our lives day by day affects how we are and definitely affects our country.

    I am working and praying and hoping that the people will change so that the system will change. I am just beginning to do something small. I can always try, I might fail but that is part of life.

    I love you Philippines and I am always… crying.. and praying … and try to make a difference…for you…

  5. There’s a filipina down the street from me that just put her 5 kids up for adoption because her husband left her. The husband was a filipino.

    The problem is birth control. A family can’t gain wealth if they’re having 8 children to a mother.

    I think a social program that just pays people 2500 pesos to get ‘fixed’ would do the trick.

    2.5Billion USD later half the population of the philippines will be fixed and the population growth rate will drop sharply. After 40-80 years the wealth will go back to a few hands and a lot of families will be able to afford to educate the 1 or 2 children they do have into a better life.

    I don’t know about anyone else. But I’m american and had to work 2 jobs just to put myself through college. Then you have these people with 8 children who think everything should be given to them on a gold platter because they’re “poor”. Well, I got a few words for you… go fuck yourself.. At least that won’t produce anymore babies.

    There was a kid in india that saw a PICTURE, not a diagram, or technical specification, a PICTURE of a windmill and then made one out of spare parts. He’s now using this to power his home in india. The philippines is one of the most resource rich countries per area than any other country i’ve seen before in my life. If these people can’t make it with what they’ve got and their own smarts then darwin would suggest that they don’t have what it takes. The sari-sari stores and restraunts are a good example. Everyone just copies everyone else. Every house has a sari-sari store, none of them make much if any money. Maybe 20 pesos a day. The restraunts on the street are the same, they all sell the same stuff. There’s no ingenuity, or creativity to be found.

    Then theres this sign near my house someone put up “God please save us”. I’m thinking “why the fuck would he save you? God helps those that help themselves, get up off your ass and go do something”. Meanwhile, san miguel laughs all the way to the bank as a whole family sits at the corner store drinking away the 40 pesos they were able to make for the day.

    You have a brain, use it!

  6. How much has the Philippines really changed over the past 20 years? I am not talking about the few skyscrapers and luxury apartments for the rich. I am talking about the over all social and economical progress being made in the Philippines. Nothing ever reall changes, except Filipinas are now quickly catching up to the West in the unwed mothers department.

    The response of the government and many Filipinos in general is to blame someone else. Look outside your borders and blame the rest of the world for your own predicament. The failure of your leaders, and the failure of Filipino people to hold their government accountable, is the root of the problem.

    Filipinas end up as bar girls in Korea and Japan, (or in their own country for that matter), because Filipinos do not hold their government accountable. Filipinas end up as house servants (slaves) in the Middle East because Filipinos do not hold their government accountable. Filipinas marry men abroad because they see no hope for a decent life at home, so they roll the dice. Sometimes they end up better off, sometimes they do not. All of this is directly related to the total and absolute corruption found in the Philippines.

    Just look at the slums. What would be considered intolerable living conditions for dogs and cats in the West, are still better conditions than many Filipino children find themselves in. As many times as I have been to the Philippines I still cannot believe what I see in Manila. How to the rich and powerful sleep at night with this right outside their door? Children hungry, dirty, homeless, infected with TB, sniffing paint, wondering around like wild animals, with no one to protect them. It is horrible.

    Filipinos need to get angry for once. I have been around enough Filipinos to know most of them are too passive. Sure, you have the activists, but most of them are focused on finding excuses outside their borders. Sensational stories about a few bad foreigners bring them out in droves, burning American flags, wanting American soldiers brought to justice. Lots of distractions from the real and underlying problems.

    Instead of Filipino society as a whole saying enough is enough, many just find ways to distract themsleves. Instead of fighting to stop the corruption, they give up their pride and dignity to get by. Many Filipinas resort to demeaning and demoralizing ways to make a living because they have decided to accept the unacceptable.

    Just do an image search on google for the word “filipina” with the safe search turned off and what do you see? Enough said.

  7. dinwieddie says:

    Thank you, blog poster and commenters !!!

    I apprecialte the blogger’s outrage and the insightful comments. I respect and agree with all of your thoughts because each of you represent an important viewpoint, along with many other viewpoints unrepresented. Most governments of the world practice capitalism. Capitalism is defined as an economic system characterized by freedom of the market with increasing concentration of private and corporate ownership of production and distribution means, proportionate to increasing accumulation and reinvestment of profits. With such being the case the majority of the world’s people will be controlled by the rule of law instituted by the corporations who now control almost all, if not technically all of the governments of the world. It seems to me that most capatalist don’t value people whether their rich, middle class or poor. They seem to only value the power that comes with their increasing control of governments which brings control of that government’s people and natural resources. I really don’t think their will be any taking back of governments, morality, decency or anything else. Pandora’s box has been opened and it can’t be closed by any human means. Pandora’s box represent that which is evil , untruthful and illusionary. Once it was opened and its contents released into the world, its effect is the creation of evil people victimizing whomever. Unfortunately there will always be evil, selfish people, on earth, who without hesitation, will destroy the lives of the majority of the world’s people, along with its numerous other creatures and liveforms for their moment of pleasure, power, glory or self satisfaction. In order for a victim to be able to help his/her self, someone has to care enough to try an teach that person, that their is a positive way of changing their life. It starts with a belief in education. and an understanding of their own self worth and how that self worth can be empowered through the struggle of obtaining an education. However, education usually becomes, ” Following a program of study instituted by capitalist’s, that ultimately makes a person a slave or servant of the capitalistic system “, which keeps the process of victimization, healthy and growing !!!

    I think its important and necessary that every person look at how closely their alligned with the capitalist system. If you agree with the status quo, your beliefs and values will support it. If a person doesn’t agree with the status quo then one should make the necessay changes in their beliefs and values to not support its victimization of the world’s people, its numerous creatures and lifeforms, which are all to be valued, respected, and protected !!!

    A person’s choice will alway cost them, one way or another !!

  8. Hmmm… What is it that is in common to the half korean, japanese, american and “whatever” children? Why, it’s the Filipina mothers! It takes two to make a baby. The foreigners did not force those women into bars. They only take advantage of them once they are already there. Perhaps you should look at your own economy, moral climate, and culture (or lack thereof).

    Sorry if this is harsh. I have great admiration and respect for traditional Filipinas, although they are apparently an endangered species… increasingly hard to find.

    As a retired member of the US Air Force, I was always infuriated at the accusation that the Americans were to blame for the prostitution in Pampanga. We have been gone since 1991, yet Angeles City’s sex tourism industry is thriving at a high! There are more bars there now than when the US Air Force was there. Worse, there are many more obvious and open all-Pilipino bars and kareoke joints lining the national highway… complete with bargirls dancing in the streets and alleys to attract PINOY customers.

    The rate of single Filipina mothers who were abandoned by Pinoy fathers is also at an astonishing all-time high, as is rape and incest at the hands of Filipino men. Are these atrocities somehow worse when committed by foreigners?

    Filipina sex chat, webcam, pornography, and especially romance scams are notorious worldwide, and at epidemic proportions. And this despite a growing economy, better overall standard of living, and more accessible educational system today.

    Clean up your own backyard instead of blaming the rest of the world. The Filipino people are not victims. Much of the world is worse off than the Philippines, yet these problems are not as severe, especially in other ASIAN countries.

    Wake up. The charm of the Philippines is fading fast, and the world view of Filipinos is continuing to decline.

  9. My take on this is filipinas are just mostly undisciplined bunch of women i have two kids in the philippines for a filipina i am a foreigner i support my kids there but what happens is i send the money there to support my kids and i find out the woman is doing other things with the money instead of taking care of the kids so if they have that mentality who should feel sorry for their plight.

  10. I read all your comments with interest. I thought about to go to the Philiphines for a vaction (not sex) i am an older backpacker but i changed my mind. What you discuss and describe dosent put the country in a flattering light.

    Prostitution seems to be rampant and much worse than i imagin. So its gonna be Vietnam instead. The goverment should put its house in order and crack down on the sexindustry. It is degrading the people and the country.

  11. You’ve got to be kidding me!

    I don’t know any Filipina that has children from missing foreign fathers. I do however know of one American man that was thinking about not going back to his girl because she was pregnant. Sad.

    I know a LOT of Filipina that have children with men married to other women. There are two women in my compound that were having affairs with married men. They are both pregnant. One is 19 and just got fired, she says because she’s pregnant. She now considers her life to be miserable and is blaming the man. Well he’s a bum but she knew he was married. What the heck did she expect? I know she’s not stupid. She surely didn’t exercise much sense here.

    I don’t know much about the other woman. He took off about three months ago. She’s about five months pregnant.

    There is another Filipina I know, she’s got a seven year old. No father in site.

    Aww the list is too long. I know a LOT of Filipina that have children and their fathers are no where to be found.

    I can’t believe my eyes or maybe you wrote it to just to get attention. One old trick is to write something shocking to get people angry and lots of links back to the site.

    The position you’ve taken is absurd.
    .-= Cebu Experience´s last blog ..Buying American Products =-.

  12. I am going to admit to not reading the entire article in detail. It reminds me of this “seminar” I had to attend to to just have my husband’s last name on my Philippine passport (I am married to a foreigner). It seems highly biased and runs on a myth that is just a myth.

    I feel a little disheartened with the thought that filipinas marry foreigners to get out of poverty (especially marrying older foreigners). Because for the likes of me, that is a generalization that is JUST that a generalization. I am married to a man 24 years my senior. I have never yet left this country to be with him in his country, and he has chosen to retire here.

    I am EDUCATED! Infact I have a salary that equals his monthly pension. I certainly do not need a man to “get me out of poverty”. And more and more I have met women who are my contemporaries, highly educated but marrying foreigner men. Do you think that it is only about poverty? I think not.

    If anything I think our filipino men have to ask themselves the same question as perhaps American women would have to ask themselves… why are our men/women going off to another country to marry men/women of another nationality?

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